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Probably something you would like… UPDATED with a new link!

I have to start off by saying this is NOT a sponsored post. As you all know, I am always sharing little things that I find and love here on the blog, and this is another one of those. In this case, I fell in love with a product and I contacted the company to see if they would be willing to hook you guys up with a deal, but I’m not getting paid for posting this or even getting a discount for myself. I would never cheapen PSYWL by turning it into a paid sponsorship type thing, just so you know.

Have you heard about Blue Apron?  Until a few weeks ago, I hadn’t either.  And then suddenly all of my friends were talking about it on Facebook.

Basically, Blue Apron is a food prep/delivery service. Each week, subscribers receive a box with the prepped ingredients for three meals along with recipes for preparing them. When I first heard about it, I thought it would probably be a good thing for people who don’t cook much, but I am a culinary school grad and it just seemed kind of…silly.

But then my friend Kate sent me a coupon code for a free box so I decided to try it. I mean, $60 worth of free food was nothing to sneeze at, right?

Blue Apron product shot 1

Our first box came three weeks ago. Right from the start, it’s hard not to be impressed. The packaging is thoughtful and effective. Everything was well insulated and each ingredient is carefully packaged and labeled. The produce included in each box has been top notch– there hasn’t been one ingredient that I would’t  have selected myself if I were at the farmer’s market.

When I say everything you need for each recipe is included, I mean EVERYTHING. If a recipe calls for a tablespoon of butter, you get a tablespoon of butter. The only thing I’ve ever run across that wasn’t included was salt for salting something to taste, and I think once we had to use our own tablespoon of olive oil. Otherwise, if you need it, it’s in the box

Blue Apron Ingredient

Here are the actual ingredients for our first three meals. I will say, if I have anything negative to say about Blue Apron, it’s the fact that all that packaging makes me feel guilty. I’m not sure how else they could do it though, so I don’t have a solution.

Now, about the recipes. I am a bit of a food snob. It’s not something I’m necessarily proud of, but I would rather have an apple and a nice piece of cheese for dinner than eat something bad or even just okay. I can honestly say that we haven’t had a dud yet in the 9 meals we have prepared from Blue Apron. I can also honestly say that a few of the meals have really surprised me by putting together flavor combos that I wouldn’t have thought of. We all tend to get in our little cooking ruts and it’s nice to have someone else come up with the ideas for a change.

Now, I can’t personally attest to the quality of the recipes because (and this is the biggest surprise of this whole experience) Mike has completely taken over our Blue Apron boxes. He has cooked every single meal since we got them.

I think this is the beauty of the Blue Apron service. Mike likes cooking but doesn’t have a lot of time for meal planning or grocery shopping. With Blue Apron, He gets to concentrate on the part of cooking that he likes– the cooking.  Mike says the recipes are all clear and easy to follow, even with minimal experience. And since everything he has made has been delicious and technically well prepared, I’m inclined to believe him.

Here are the meals we’ve had so far: (Sorry I didn’t take more pics! I wasn’t planning to blog about this in the beginning and also, I was hungry.)

Pan-roasted Salmon Ramen (this one was great!)

Pork chops

Center-cut Pork Chops with Beet, Heirloom Carrots and Hazelnut Salad (an example of flavors I wouldn’t have put together but it was my favorite so far.)

Crispy Chicken Thighs with Kumquat Relish & Freekeh Salad (I had never even HEARD of freekeh before)

Bouillabaisse-Style Fish Stew (this was amazing!)

Pan-Roasted Chicken with Mashed Potatoes & Maple-Glazed Carrots (Gabbi’s favorite so far)

Blue Apron BoxSteak & Miso-Roasted Vegetable Salad

Shrimp Po’Boy Sandwiches with Butter Lettuce & Apple Salad (very good, especially the salad dressing)

Chicken & Sage Biscuit Pot Pie with Cremini Mushrooms & Purple Tops Turnips (this one is on deck for tonight)

So you are probably asking yourself, how expensive is this box of wonderment? Honestly, it’s not that expensive. We get the two-person box with three meals per week. It works out to a little under $60 (including delivery), or $10 per serving. Now that may sound like a lot, but we realized quickly that the convenience of having everything we needed on hand and not running to the grocery store for ingredients (and ending up spending a minimum of $50/trip) and not eating out cause neither of us has through about dinner means we are actually saving money with Blue Apron. (I may be a food snob but I am also cheap. Trust me, it’s a good deal.)

We are also eating healthier (each menu is between 500-700 calories per person) and throwing away way less food.

We are also now positively evangelical about Blue Apron, as you can see. Which is why I emailed the company and told them that I have a little yarn company and a little blog, and would they like to offer our readers a special deal?

They were just lovely about it and said yes. My first 50 readers to try Blue Apron will get two free meals with their first Blue Apron box. You have to follow this link to get the Juniper Moon Farm deal, though.  ****

Bleu Apron Discount

When you click the link, it will take you to the page screen-shot-ed above. Click on the orange “redeem offer” button to get the discount. (If you have trouble, let me know!)

So give it a whirl. And let me know how it works for you. If you have any questions, I’ll try to answer them in the comments, but you can find tons of info on the Blue Apron FAQs as well.

**** We have a new working link, y’all!

Giveaway Winner!

Thanks so much for all the love you all gave to our new pattern collections and to Neve, our newest Spring/Summer yarn. We have a few more patterns to share with you next week, but I’ll be taking a break for the rest of this week to bring you some other content.

In the meantime, the winner of our Neve Giveaway, chosen at random, is:

 

Giveaway winner!

Marja (lovely name, by the way) please email me with your shipping address to claim your six gorgeous skeins of Neve!

And be sure to check out JMF Facebook page later today to see if you won the giveaway over there.

 

Up next, The Uptown Collection

Can you believe that we have even more amazing news patterns that you haven’t seen yet? It’s crazy but it’s true! The Uptown Collection uses our Findley DK yarn, but all of these patterns can also be knit in the varigated version, Findley DK Dappled, if you prefer.

BLUE LAUREL hat and mitts set

Blue Laurel Hat and Mitts (Knit by the lovely Jen B.)

KHALIFA shell, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

KHALIFA shell, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

KHALIFA shell, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Khalifa Shell (knit by Danielle K.)

PIPER Cardi, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

PIPER Cardi, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Piper Cardi

LUCY Collared Tee, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

LUCY Collared Tee, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

LUCY Collared Tee, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Lucy Collared Tee

As always, these are all available as individual printed patterns at your local yarn shop and as downloadable PDFs on Ravlery. You can find our yarns n the same shops or by using our store locator.

If you love these patterns, please help us spread the word by heart-ing and queueing them on Ravelry, and/or pinning them on Pinterest.

Once again, all photographs by the brilliant  Caro Sheridan, with the exception of the Piper Cardi which was shot by yours truly.

Introducing The Penny Collection!

The Penny Collection are all patterns by Pam Wynne using our Findley DK Dappled in variegated colors.

CALLIE Shawl, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

the Callie Shawl (knit by Katherine Giardina)

DOTTIE Pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

DOTTIE Pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

The Dottie Pullover

English Mesh Infinity Scarf, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

English Mesh Infinity Scarf, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

English Mesh Scarf (Knit by Marie G.)

FRANKIE hat and mitts, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry. FRANKIE hat and mitts, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Frankie Hat and Mitts (knit by Gillian G.)

GLENN Cardi, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

GLENN Cardi, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

GLENN Cardi, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Glenn Cardi (Teri Smith)

IVY tee, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

IVY tee, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Ivy Tee

PATTY pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

PATTY pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Patty Pullover (knit by one of my knitting A-Team, Teresa H.-F.)

PENNY open Cardigan, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

PENNY open Cardigan, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.Penny Open Cardigan

As always, these are all available as individual printed patterns at your local yarn shop and as downloadable PDFs on Ravlery. You can find our yarns n the same shops or by using our store locator.

If you love these patterns, please help us spread the word by heart-ing and queueing them on Ravelry, and/or pinning them on Pinterest.

Once again, all photographs by the brilliant  Caro Sheridan, except the Penny Open Cardi that was shot by me.

First Snow!

Yesterday we finally got visited by Old Man Winter. When it was all said and done we ended up with at least six inches, though we were expecting up to twelve. The sheep have been enjoying the colder weather and when I went out for evening feeding there was a lot of sproinging and prancing, even with the snow!

02.17.15a

02.17.15b

Wembley

02.17.15c

Alabama

02.17.15d

02.17.15e

02.17.15f

02.17.15g

Pretty McPhee

02.17.15h

02.17.15i

02.17.15j

Orion can’t allow me to wander the field without being about 2 inches from my pockets, just in case I’ve brought treats out.

02.17.15k

Lyra

02.17.15l

02.17.15m

Sabine and Lucy

02.17.15n

02.17.15o

We removed the sides of the shelter after the high winds the last few days did some damage, but it’s still enough shelter to keep the hay snow-free.

02.17.15p

The chickens had ZERO interest in going out in the snow.

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The goats don’t much like getting wet, either.

02.17.15r

Yeardley

02.17.15s

The sun is out and it is very, very bright today.

02.17.15t

Lucy’s been enjoying playing in the snow with the kids.

And now I’ll leave you with pictures of Samantha and Roquefort’s nightly post-feeding frolic.

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02.17.15v

02.17.15w

The Electric Collection

Last year, we released one of our most popular yarns ever, Zooey! A  60% cotton/40% linen yarn that is perfect for summer knitting.

This year, we’ve released Zooey in a rainbow of new colors.

Juniper Moon Farm's Zooey, a cotton/linen yarn for summer knitting.

Pam Wynne designed four lovely garment that really show off this yarn. You are going to have trouble picking which to knit first.

MONATOMIC Tunic, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

MONATOMIC Tunic, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

MONATOMIC Tunic, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

MONATOMIC Tunic, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Monatomic Tunic (knit by my friend Beverly K.)

CIRCADIAN pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

CIRCADIAN pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

CIRCADIAN pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Circadian Pullover

ARGONIC dress, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

ARGONIC dress, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

ARGONIC dress, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

ARGONIC dress, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Argonic Dress (knit by the uber-talented Pam A.)

FIREFLY_collar_medium2

FIREFLY_back_medium2

FIREFLY wrap, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Firefly Wrap (knit by Deb T., a test knitter extraordinaire who I hope I never have to live without!)

As always, these are all available as individual printed patterns at your local yarn shop and as downloadable PDFs on Ravlery. You can find our yarns n the same shops or by using our store locator.

If you love these patterns, please help us spread the word by heart-ing and queueing them on Ravelry, and/or pinning them on Pinterest.

Once again, all photographs by the brilliant  Caro Sheridan.

The Stria Collection, a new yarn and a giveaway!

Had enough yet? Or are you hungry for more?

Today, I bring you The Stria Collection! All of the designs below are knit in our new yarn Neve. Neve is a 100% cotton yarn with a lovely soft hand. It’s named after one of the best people ever born, my friend Neve. Neve works her backside off on the farm and is an all-around good egg. Isn’t that enough reason to have a yarn named after you?

Neve

 Designer Pam Wynne did some really cool things with this new yarn.

Campbell Shawl, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Campbell Shawl, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Campbell Shawl (knit by my dear friend Brenda B.)

Oasis Pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Oasis Pullover, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Oasis Pullover

RUPERT, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

RUPERT, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Rupert Vest

SIDNEY, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

SIDNEY, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Sidney Tee (knit by the wonderful Laurie M.)

PORTRAIT Throw and Pillow knitting patterns from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

PORTRAIT Throw and Pillow knitting patterns from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

The Portrait Throw and Pillow (Knit by Lyn C. and Ann K., respectively.)

Old Shale Kitchen Towel, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravery. Old Shale Kitchen Towel, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravery.

Old Shale Kitchen Towel

STRIPEY potholder, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

and Stripey Potholder (Both beautifully knit by Carol P. and my good friend Erin L.)

As always, these are all available as individual printed patterns at your local yarn shop and as downloadable PDFs on Ravlery. You can find our yarns n the same shops or by using our store locator.

If you love these patterns, please help us spread the word by heart-ing and queueing them on Ravelry, and/or pinning them on Pinterest.

Once again, all photographs by the brilliant  Caro Sheridan.

 Now for the giveaway:

To celebrate the release of this collection and the new yarn, I’m giving away six skeins of Neve to a lucky blog reader. Leave a comment on this post telling me what you would like to knit from this collection. For a second chance to win, visit our Facebook page and leave a comment on the giveaway post over there.

The deadline for entry is 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, February 18th, 2015.

Good luck everyone!

Modern Amusements

Today we’re introducing Modern Amusements, a knitwear collection by Pam Wynne that features our most popular yarn Moonshine, a blend of wool, alpaca, silk and moonbeams. (I’m kidding about the moonbeams, but it does have a lovely glow due to the other fibers.)

LUNA by Pam Wynne. Pattern available on Ravelry

LUNA by Pam Wynne. Pattern available on Ravelry

Luna Pullover. (Knit by the amazing LA Bourgeois.)

DREAMLAND, a knitting pattern by Pam Wynne available on Ravelry

DREAMLAND, a knitting pattern by Pam Wynne available on Ravelry

Dreamland (knit by my neighbor, Marie G.)

BOARDWALK, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Boardwalk Shawl

TILLY, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

TILLY, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

TILLY, a knitting pattern from Juniper Moon Farm. Available on Ravelry.

Tilly Cardigan

These are all available as individual printed patterns at your local yarn shop and as downloadable PDFs on Ravlery. You can find our yarns n the same shops or by using our store locator.

If you love these patterns, please help us spread the word by heart-ing and queueing them on Ravelry, and/or pinning them on Pinterest.

Once again, all photographs by the brilliant  Caro Sheridan.

 

Our Spring/Summer 2015 Collection is HERE!

The last few weeks have been a flurry of activity as we prepared to release our new yarns and patterns for the Spring/Summer season.

I know that I am always enthusiastic about the pattern designs that we release, but this collection is actually something extra special. Designer Pam Wynne has created a knitwear collection that pretty much defines the Juniper Moon Farm aesthetic.  And, because Pam is a passionate knitter (like you) the patterns are well-crafted and fun to knit.

I’m going to introduce you to one collection per day, because there is so much here and I want each pattern to get it’s due.

All of these garments are designed using Juniper Moon Farm yarns. (You can find our yarns at your local yarn shop or by using our store locator.) The patterns are available as printed patterns in the same shops and as downloadable PDFs on Ravlery.

First up, The Downtown Collection, knit in Sabine.

Buckham Cardigan

CLIO_full_medium2-1

Clio

FENTON_hero_medium2

Fenton Dress. Pattern available on Ravelry.

FENTON_full_medium2

The Fenton Dress

HOW RIDICULOUSLY ADORABLE IS THIS DRESS?!?!?!

huron1_medium2-1

Huron Pullover

This sweater is a wardrobe staple for me. It can be dressed up with a pencil skirt or worn with jeans every day.

If you love these patterns, please help us spread the word by heart-ing and queueing them on Ravelry, and/or pinning them on Pinterest.

All photographs by the brilliant  Caro Sheridan.

Our favorite PITA dinner

It has been a million years since I’ve written a blog post! I would like to say I feel bad about this, but the truth is, I just haven’t had the motivation– or the energy– for doing much but the bare minimum lately. My pregnancy is going fantastically and I have nothing to complain about besides the fact that I’m just tired by the time I finish all the stuff that I have to get done in a day.

Blogging isn’t the only thing in my life that has suffered, though. I have done so little cooking in the last six months that its shameful! We’ve resorted to scrambled eggs for dinner more times than I can count, along with baked potatoes (yes, just baked potatoes by themselves), rotisserie chickens and a whole lot of take-out food. On the rare occasions when I’m home alone for dinner, I can’t even muster that level of cooking- tea and toast are good enough for just me!

So on Sunday, when Mike asked me to make his very favorite dinner, I didn’t have a whole lot of excuses for saying no. In addition to the fact that I’ve been phoning it in for months, Mike has filled the gap in innumerable ways every day, taking over chores that were previously mine and making sure I get plenty of rest. Since he had spent the weekend putting the finishing touches on the nursery (mudding and sanding the walls, painting, putting together furniture, hanging window treatments, building a bookcase, etc.) I figured dinner was the least I could do.

I feel a little bit guilty that I’m sharing this recipe with you all, because the results are delicious and it’s sure to become a favorite with the people you feed. Those people will want you to put this into your regular rotation of meals and the truth is, it’s a total pain in the ass to make. One hundred and ten percent worth all the effort, time in the kitchen and dirty dishes, but a PITA, nevertheless.

Roasted Vegetables with Couscous and Goat Cheese

Ladies and gentlemen, I give you…Roasted Vegetables with Couscous and Goat Cheese! (This recipe actually originated with Erin, JMF’s very first employee and one of my dearest friends. I will never forgive her for introducing me to it.)

I know what you are thinking. It doesn’t sound like such a big deal to roast some veggies and throw them on top of couscous. But the key to making this amazing dish is in the details, y’all.

Much like my famous Terribly Inconvenient Granola recipe, the key to Roasted Vegetable with Couscous and Goat Cheese is cooking each individual ingredient separately to it’s individual peak of perfection, and then combining them all at the end.

Other than the fact that it takes a lot of time to chop and cook each individual vegetable, leaving your kitchen looking like it’s been pillaged by huns (huns with a deep appreciation of olive oil) it’s a cinch to pull off.

Start by deciding which vegetables you want to include. I like to  do a minimum of eight and I switch some of them up depending on my mood and what’s in season. You can use pretty much anything but I highly recommend including parsnips, mushrooms of some sort, whole heads of garlic and grape tomatoes.  Caramelized onions are a must. This particular day, I added carrots, tiny potatoes, shallots, sweet potatoes  to the mix.

When you are grocery shopping for this dinner, you will need to keep telling yourself that you need more vegetables than you think. People tend to eat a lot more of vegetarian dishes than the do when their is a slab of meat involved. I once served enormous quantities of this dish to a big party at my farm house. I bought a minimum of five pounds of each vegetable, thinking it would be awesome to have leftover the next day to put in omelets. In reality, there wasn’t enough food and I ended up with nothing on my plate but couscous and an onion. For reals. Buy more than you think you need.

When you get home from the market, preheat your oven to 450 degrees immediately. All the veggies will be cooked at the same temperature but for different lengths of time. If you have two oven, thank your lucky stars for all the good fortune you have and preheat them both. I only have one oven but I use my toaster oven as a second.

You are going to need a large bowl, olive or avocado oil, kosher salt and just about every cookie sheet, roasting pan and pyrex dish you own.

Chop each individual vegetable type, keeping in mind that your goal is to create smallish pieces that will cook at the same rate.

With carrots, I cut them in half length-wise and them split the thicker top halves in half again. Same with parsnips. I cheated and bought the cubed sweet potatoes that my grocery stores has in the produce section, which saves a ton of time. I washed and halved crimini mushrooms, trimming just a tiny bit off the stems.

The tiny potatoes I leave whole. Same with the grape tomatoes. After you chop all the carrots, throw them in the large bowl, drizzle them with oil and sprinkle with salt and give them a good toss. (Tongs are great for this.)

When everything is evenly coated, throw them onto a pan and pop them into the oven.  Try not to over crowd your pans, as that will lead to steaming which is not what you want here at all. Steamed vegetables are very hard to get a good brown roast on, so give your veggies some elbow room. Then tackle the parsnips the same way.

For the tiny potatoes, I boil them in salted water until tender before roasting them because otherwise they take forever. Actually, this is why I usually just leave them out.

Keep working through the vegetables, saving the sweet potatoes for last if you are using them. I cook everything for this dish with only oil and salt, with the exception of the sweet potatoes. They also get a half a teaspoon of so of cumin powder thrown in. (By saving them for last, you won’t have to wash your bowl in between the other veggies.) Also, if the sweet potatoes are nicely cubed, they will have one of the shortest cooking time.

With shallots and garlic, leave them whole and unpeeled. Throw them in the bowl with oil and then place them in a baking dish and cover with foil tightly. Into the oven they go.

One absolute essential to making this dish work is caramelized onions. If you are going to leave them out, you may as well skip the whole dish. To caramelize the onions, peel a couple of large onions and cut them in half along the hemisphere (not the equator!) keeping the stem intact. Slice the onion thinly and uniformly into half circles.  Place the onions in a sauté pan over medium heat with a couple teaspoons of oil and cook them slowly until they are brown to dark brown in color. You can’t rush caramelizing onions, but it’s going to take you a while to roast all those veggies, so no worries.

As the vegetables cook on their individual pans, check them from time to time for doneness but try not to open the oven doors too much, as it will slow everything down. You will know they are done when they are nicely burnished and fork-tender. Stuff is going to be coming out of the oven at different times and your faster cooking veggies will have to wait on the slower ones. Don’t fret about that.

When it looks like most of the vegetables are nearing completion, and your caramelized onions are finished, it’s time to start the couscous. Like with the vegetables, make more couscous than you think you’ll need. I usually make two cups of dry couscous for a couple of people and count on having leftovers.

When the couscous is done, fluff it with a fork and then spoon it into the center of a platter. (After going to all this trouble, you really want the wow factor of a platter.) Surround the couscous with various veggies in discrete piles so that your diners can pick and chose what they want. On top of the steaming couscous, place an ample dollop of goat cheese (or Boursin cheese, which takes this dish into the sublime) and scatter everything with the caramelized onions. Encourage your guests to take a big spoonful of the cheese, along with their couscous and vegetables, and to squeeze to some of the roasted garlic onto their plates. (You should probably have more cheese on the table, as people always ask for more.

Voila! You have made an amazingly delicious dinner in only 150 simple steps! Sure it took you three hours to roast all those vegetable but it really is totally worth it.

Some other vegetables I like to use in this dish are:

-roasted asparagus (trim the ends only and roast briefly)

-cubed butternut squash

-pan-charred green beans

-zucchini, slice long and roasted or grilled

- red bell peppers, cut into small strips.

You can use just about anything that will hold up to a hot oven. I’d love to hear what your favorite combos are.

P.S. You deserve a medal for wading through that wall of text. Give yourself an extra piece of dessert tonight.

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